Candace Corrigan
Candace Corrigan
Songwriter, Producer

                                                                                 Sampler: Michigan Pioneer Women

                                                                             O'Carolan Songwriter Project

new website candace.jpg
jns me in backyard.jpg

About

an introduction

I am a songwriter, musician, playwright, and producer. I am particularly interested in the honest portrayal of stories collected from writings, diaries, and speeches of women who lived from 1779 through 1950. This is reflected in my first project, Sampler: Michigan Pioneer Women, has been recently rerecorded and released.

The O'Carolan Songwriter Project, produced with my friends Janne Henshaw and Sarah Wilfong, is a collection of the Irish master Turlough O'Carolan that features the lyrics to some of his compositions, adapted from the original Gaelic into English song form. I am exceptionally proud of this beautiful album. 

I also produce video, and will be featuring "Hurrah, Son, and Vote for Suffrage!" in honor of a new statue coming soon to Knoxville, Tennessee.

I intend this new website to be a retrospective of all my work, and will be putting up new versions of my projects as they are completed. I hope you enjoy listening to these recordings as much as I have enjoyed making them.

New Sampler cover.jpg

sampler: Michigan pioneer women

Years ago, while living in Michigan, I read an article in a local paper that contained excerpts from women's diaries written during the American Civil War. I went down to my local library to research these diaries and one of them became the basis for the song "Mary Wallace".

Soon after that I was asked to write a song for a friend about her grandmother, who had been a cook in a lumber camp, which resulted in the song "Jenny Justine Jokala."

Later, through sponsorship of the Kalamazoo Historical Society, I received a grand from the Michigan Humanities Council. The project was to write 12 ballads based on diaries, speeches, and stories collected in the oral tradition. The result is a collection of songs that I suppose would have surprised the original writers, but I think would still be recognizable to each of them. Whenever possible I used their exact words, which had the effect of making each ballad very honest. After visiting the collection so many years later, I am amazed at the serendipity that lead me to these particular women, and how the songs almost wrote themselves.

I will always be grateful to my original humanities scholars and friends and family who helped me make "Sampler happen. Their expertise, scholarship, direction and love are far from forgotten by me.

I hope you enjoy this version of these songs, as much as my friends and I have enjoyed recording them.